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Art Talk - Ten Questions

Drunk Wolf

 A glimpse behind the scenes into the artists studios and a look at the creative workings from artists across the world. A fascinating insight and privileged look into what makes them tick and why they do what they do…


drunk wolf artist      drunk wolf artist

1. How long have you been an artist?

Ever since I was little I was at my happiest being creative. Drawing, painting, anything really. I studied art to GCSE level. It put me off taking it further. I had a really archaic stuck in his ways teacher who made you do watercolours of a lake by a mountain, which I felt defeated the purpose of being creative as it was being dictated to me, so I didn’t take it further academically. In the mid 2000’s I started dabbling digitally, mainly in flash making animations with some of them making it on to TV. I started messing about with spray paints in 2008/9 without any real clue as to what I was doing other than I liked what I saw in places like Brick Lane, Bristol and Brighton and wanted to do the same, but smaller scale, so I took to painting on canvases, pieces of wood, card, anything I could get my hands on and I’ve been doing it ever since. I’ve returned to digital art too, brought about by creating prints of the work I’d painted, but now I make a lot of art using photoshop and illustrator now too.

2. What is your preferred medium and roughly what is the process for creating your work?

Definitely spray painting first over digital art, although the two go somewhat hand in hand in my process. I make all my designs in photoshop either from scratch or using photo sources. Then I’ll hand draw and cut the stencils. Its the longest part of the process, but the pay off is always worth it. Then depending on if I’m layering stencils on top of each other, I’ll lay down some base colours and patterning, then overlay the stencils over the top allowing some dry time in between coats. For digital work, its literally a case of sitting there and seeing what works and what doesn’t. I’ve learned so many valuable tips and tricks either through reading or sitting watching countless hours of YouTube videos, so knowing when and where to apply what techniques gets you a wide range of results. Unlike my spray painting where I think I’ve found my ‘look’ I’m still happy experimenting with digital art, mainly because a hit of the ‘delete’ key can rectify anything I’m not happy with.

3. Describe your life as an artist in 3 words?

Learn Think Create.

4. Where do you draw your inspiration from and how does it affect your creative process?

Its probably easier to quantify where I don’t draw inspiration from. I’m always on the hunt. Always looking for something to use or try in terms of my next piece. Obviously other artists inspire me, but I draw on their dedication, perseverance and methods for inspiration rather than their actual work as I try to be unique, as does any artist I suppose. Movies, TV, music, nature, the list goes on. Places too. Brighton is amazing. A walk up and down the lanes for an hour gives you so many ideas because it just oozes creativity.

5. Who or what has had the greatest influence on your art and career so far?

I think surrounding myself with people who encourage me in what I do because they can see I’m passionate about it, or other creatives. That way I can bounce ideas off people, gauge whether what I’m saying sounds like a good idea, or will be brutally honest with me and tell me if something is terrible.

6. What is the one piece of advice you would give to a new artist?

Never stop learning. There is always something new to learn no matter what your craft is. By constantly learning you’re constantly developing your own style rather than letting it go stale relying on the same tried and tested technique you’ve churned out over and over. Test yourself with them by taking risks.

7. What is the one item in the studio you couldn’t live without?

My laptop. Even if I’m all out of all painting materials, I can still be planning, learning and researching pieces on my laptop.

8. Do you listen to music when working in the studio, if so what?

I always need to have music. Always. I tend to go for more instrumental type music when I’m working as lyrics just distract me. That being said, Godspeed, Mogwai, God Is An Astronaut and Explosions In The Sky would be my go to bands.

9. What are the best and worst things about being an artist?

Best thing – taking a tiny fleeting idea and turning it into something real and tangible that you’re really happy with. Worst thing – taking a tiny fleeting idea and turning it into something real and tangible that you’re not happy with at all.

10. Technology is a growing presence in the life of an artist, what are your favourite apps or software to assist your work and promotion?

Photoshop and Illustrator are the only software I use when I am creating artwork either digitally or to paint. Beyond that, I promote out all my work over social media, so Instagram, Twitter and Facebook Page Manager are really helpful with that.

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